Product

Wash Gloves

Med-Cover Barrier Cream Wash Gloves offers a comfortable and safe care opportunity for bedridden and intensive care patients.
Thanks to its special formulation containing 3% Dimethicone, it softens the skin and creates a barrier layer. With Vitamin E and Provitamin b5 in the content it nourishes the skin.
With Phospholipid in its special formulation, it helps damaged cells regain their lost water.

BATH IN BED INPATIENT CARE

Simple Interventions, Extraordinary Results ..
BATH IN BED Inpatient Care series products, which are especially designed for individuals who cannot meet their body care needs in normal ways, are easy to use, prevent the risk of contamination, and have a cleaning, care and protection ethic.
Soap-like products used in traditional washing methods reduce the pH of the skin, causing the skin to dry and the dry skin starts to crack after a certain period of time.
Cracks on the skin caused by extremely basic substances become open to all infection risks.

BATH IN BED Inpatient Care Series products have a neutral pH of the skin and are compatible with the skin. BATH IN BED Inpatient Care Series products have a neutral pH of the skin and are compatible with the skin.
There is a barrier layer (acid layer) on the upper surface of healthy undamaged skin to protect the skin from all external factors. However, as a result of the use of overly basic cleaning products, this layer is damaged and the skin remains open to all external threats.
Unlike similar products, BATH IN BED Inpatient Care Series products create a barrier layer on the skin with their active ingredients (Dimethicon), preventing the formation of bedsores caused by drying and cracking. Unlike similar products, BATH IN BED Inpatient Care Series products create a barrier layer on the skin with their active ingredients (Dimethicon), preventing the formation of bedsores caused by drying and cracking.
Unlike similar products, BATH IN BED Inpatient Care Series products create a barrier layer on the skin with their active ingredients (Dimethicon), preventing the formation of bedsores caused by drying and cracking. It removes dead cells from the skin with Allantoin in its composition.

PRESSURE SORES

Pressure sores are tissue losses due to anemia caused by the closure of all tissues between the external agent and the bone protrusion, fascia, muscle, skin and subcutaneous fine blood vessels and capillaries due to continuous or repetitive compression in the parts of the body where bony protrusions are located. Tissue death (necrosis) and wound opening (ulceration) can range from superficial tissue loss to subcutaneous fatty tissue, muscle, and bone tissue loss.

Density
Pressure sores are generally seen in bedridden patients and this frequency is observed to be around 9% among all inpatients. This rate is around 11% in patients hospitalized in intensive care units.
These rates vary as 41% in cardiology units, 27% in acute neurological cases, and 15% in orthopedic cases. Generally, 72% of pressure sores are seen in people over the age of seventy. 96% of pressure sores occur at the sub-umbilical level.

Why do Pressure Sores occur? 

The most important factor that stands out and emphasizes here is pressure. If the pressure between the hard abutment surface in the external environment (the place where it sits or the bed on which it lies) and the bone protrusion rises above the tissue blood pressure and exceeds the maximum time that the tissues can withstand anemia, this pressure creates a wound in that area. Neurological disorders come second among the factors that predispose to the wound. Additional factors include infection, diabetes, and advanced age.

Pressure: The pressure in the capillary blood vessels in the tissues was measured and found 32 mmHg in the arterioles. When a part of the body is exposed to pressure that exceeds this value, anemia, in other words ischemia, will occur in that area. Tissues in the body are affected differently by pressure. A pressure of 500 mmHg for 2 hours or a pressure of 100 mmHg for 10 hours is sufficient to cause muscle death (necrosis). Necrosis can occur with the application of a pressure of 600 mmHg in the skin for 11 hours. From these values, it can be seen that there may be necrosis in the subordinate tissues without necrosis of the skin.
Infection: It is an important factor in the formation of pressure sores. Bacterial contamination causes tissue necrosis by increasing collagenolytic activity in pressure sores. It has also been shown that bacteria multiply rapidly in areas with high pressure. Since the body’s defense systems are not strong enough in areas with impaired blood circulation, bacteria easily multiply in these areas. The probable reason for this is impaired immune system, moisture and ischemia, along with impaired blood circulation.
Swelling/ Edema: It is one of the important factors that facilitates or increases infection in pressure sores. Edema develops in a short time on the skin that is under pressure and has no sensation. As long as the pressure continues, arterial pressure increases and edema occurs by leaking from the plasma vascular bed. Numbness, ie denervation, is also effective in the formation of edema, paralysis (paralysis) in the muscles of the region causes impairment in the pumping function of the muscles, which causes disruption of the drainage of the lymph flow and the formation of edema.
Friction : It is a mechanism that contributes to skin ulcers, that is, wound opening, without disturbing the blood circulation and causing ischemia. Loss occurs in the upper layers of the skin as a result of friction. The separation of the upper layer of the skin and the basal (lower) layer cells of the skin results in the formation of ulceration.

Moisture : It is one of the effective factors in (ulcer) formation.Maceration (saponification), bacterial contamination and infection formation are observed in the moist area. All of these factors are effective in wound dehiscence.
In addition to these, elderly patients are constantly lying in the same position due to senile dementia and general distraction. Patients with mental retardation may encounter similar problems.
Patients who are in a coma for a long time, and those who have more than one fracture are immobile for a long time due to fractures, and in patients who remain in cast or traction for a long time, pressure sores may occur due to immobility. In spinal injuries, involuntary contractions occur in the patient as a result of the local reflex activity of the distal part of the spinal cord (spinal cord) in complete incisions. This may cause both lower extremities to rub against each other and pressure sores on the knee, inner malleolus and sole of the inner face.